Tag Archives: history

These Two Pipelines are Much Better Than the Other One

Charlie Barber, Mandan

Reprinted by permission of the au­thor and the High Plains Reader
By Charlie Barber

 

Amillion people spread out over this state [North Da­kota] is not going to seem very populated.”
– Harold Hamm, Chairman and CEO of Continental Resources

“We kind of feel like we’re drinking out of a fire hose right now.”
– Ward Koeser, Mayor, Williston, ND

“The genuine man of action is not intent on renovating the world, but on possessing it.”
– Eric Hoffer

“Our frustration is greater when we have much and want more than when we have nothing and want some.”
– Eric Hoffer

“History is made by juveniles.”
– Frederick Gentles

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New Film About People of the Upper Missouri Debuting July 12

Villages of Hidatsa and Mandan Indians are preserved at the Knife River Indian Villages National Historical Site.

By The State Historical Society of North Dakota

The premiere of a new documentary film, The People of the Upper Mis­souri: The Mandans, will be shown on Thursday, July 12 at 7 p.m. at the National Energy Center of Excellence (Room 304) at Bis­marck State College.

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Landowners Say State Government Needs to Correct Pipeline Company Tactics

From Dakota Resource Council

Some landowners in the Oil Patch say the State of North Dakota must stop ignoring major problems with current pipeline development while it pro­motes more oil pipelines as called for by the recent Governor’s pipeline summit.

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Northern Lights

By Sharon Carson

By the time you read the June issue of Prairie Independent, voters in Wisconsin will have decided whether or not to recall Governor Scott Walker in the wake of his aggressive legislative attacks on public employee unions, public education, and critical social services. The Wisconsin vote on June 5th will be historic on many levels, not least as a plumb measure of the current strength of progressive grassroots political organizing in the Midwest.

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Key Ingredients: America by Food Smithsonian Museums Project

By Sue B. Balcom

Everyone eats. Family tradi­tions and ethic backgrounds may steer the types of foods we love but eating has evolved considerably since grandma’s day.

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Hypocritical Actions on Restoration of Mined Farmland

Dear Editor:

North Dakota has the strongest law in the United States on restoration of mined farmland, but the state Supreme Court’s recent Coal Lake ruling threatens to make it a dead letter.

The court upheld the Public Service Commission’s decision that recreation was a “higher and better” use for 86 acres of mined land than raising crops.

The coal companies think up these alternatives and so far the PSC has given its blessing to all of them – golf courses, dirt bike tracks, shooting ranges, waste disposal pits. Adding these to what’s considered a “higher and better” use exempts the coal company from meeting farm productivity standards. Continue reading

Hugo is a Magical Adventure

A scene from “Hugo” courtesy of movieviral.com

By Todd Ford
Hugo
is a joy from start to finish. It’s a colorful, delightful evo­cation of 1930s Paris as play­ground for two fanciful, imag­inative kids – both orphans, one living by his own resources in a train station, the other living with her grandmother and grumpy, peculiar grandfather. It’s full of slapstick chases and funny mo­ments involving dogs. Most kids of all ages should enjoy it.

Definitely see it. Grab the DVD right away and curl up with the whole family. It should be available shortly. The crowd was pretty sparse both times I saw it. But, this isn’t really the type of review I wish to write. I’d rather tell you why it so grabbed me and won’t let go.

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